Saturday, April 11, 2009

Afghanistan’s stablitiy related with Pak situation: Holbrooke

Updated at: 1520 PST, Saturday, April 11, 2009

WASHINGTON: US President Barack Obama's special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan Richard Holbrooke said Afghanistan’s stability related with Pakistan’s situation.Pakistan is at the center of our strategic concerns, said Mr. Holbrooke while talking to US newspaper “Wall Street Journal”."If Afghanistan had the best government on earth, a drug-free culture and no corruption it would still be unstable if the situation in Pakistan remained as today. That is an undisputable fact, and that is the core of the dilemma that the Western nations, the NATO alliance, face today."Mr. Holbrooke says, " The reason for fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan is clear: The Taliban are the frontrunners for al Qaeda. If they succeed in Afghanistan, without any shadow of a doubt, al Qaeda would move back into Afghanistan, set up a larger presence, recruit more people and pursue its objectives against the United States even more aggressively." Public support for the expanded U.S. Afghan mission hinges on making this case stick.Mr. Holbrooke says, "We face a common threat, a common challenge." Pakistani civilians are concerned by the rising number of suicide bombings, now seen in once tranquil Islamabad and Lahore.” Mr. Holbrooke says the Pakistani president "deserves credit for his personal courage" in holding the job. As part of a "long-term commitment to Pakistan," the Obama administration wants to lock in billions in aid for the country. Military officials also say the scope of Predator strikes will be broadened, against Pakistani official objections, and efforts to get the adversarial Pakistani and Afghan intelligence services to cooperate will be intensified. Mr. Holbrooke insists the U.S. will respect Pakistan's "red lines" about American combat troops."Some people say to me, 'Why don't we go in there with our troops and just clean it up?'" he says. "First of all we can't without their permission, and that would not be a good idea. Secondly, cleaning them up in the mountains of Pakistan's tribal areas, as anyone can see from the search for al Qaeda in Afghanistan, is a daunting mission. It's the same kind of mountains. A few weeks ago I flew up through the deepest and remotest valleys imaginable. You could see tiny villages in the crevices in the mountains. You don't want American troops in there. So that option's gone."

No comments:

Post a Comment

Word of the Day

Article of the Day

This Day in History

Today's Birthday

In the News

Hangman